Tag: industrial

NSF Zones and Classifications for Food Processing Lights

The National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) governs and certifies equipment in the food service and manufacturing sector. Through various regulations and standards, the non-profit organization actively promotes food safety. For safe illumination in food processing sites, the NSF certifies lighting systems to ensure proper performance in such environments. Fixtures in industrial food manufacturing facilities must be capable of withstanding water jets from frequent wash-down sessions, as well as extreme temperatures found in sterilization tanks and freezers. Read below to learn more about food processing lights.

Non-food Zones

According to the NSF, a non-food zone is a location that doesn’t come in direct contact with food, food products and materials. Furthermore, a lighting system in this section of the food processing facility is expected to be exposed to cleaning agents and solutions used during wash-down sessions.

Based on these characteristics, a work light in a non-food zone should be waterproof, with an IP rating of IP65 or higher. Additionally, the units should be protected with shatterproof lens in order to reduce the risk of breakage, when exposed to water jets or during maintenance. For the light’s housing, materials capable of resisting corrosion are preferred. This can increase the lifespan of the units and decrease warping.

Splash and Food Zones

Like non-food zones, splash zones in food processing plants does not come in direct contact with food, food products and edible ingredients. Lights installed in such parts of the building must be able to withstand high-pressure, water jets from wash-down sessions.

Examples of splash zones include wet food processing locations and sections of the facility that experiences constant wash-down. By comparison, examples of non-food zones include dry food processing locations, industrial kitchens and large-scale food storage rooms.

Lastly, it is important to highlight that the NSF does not provide guidelines for lights in food zones. This is because the organization does not expect lights to come in direct contact with food products.

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Effects of Vibration on Industrial LED Lights

Industrial lighting systems are exposed to vibration from nearby heavy-duty equipment, as well as wind. Such elements become amplified when the units are mounted on a pole. Read on to understand how to address and reduce vibration-related issues for Industrial LED lights in rugged work environments.

Sources of Vibration

In outdoor work sites, such as construction, light poles are prone to random blasts of wind. Such locations can be areas with minimal buildings or obstructions to redirect wind, as well as high elevation or mountainous regions.

Interestingly, poles at heights 20 feet (or higher) are more likely to experience strong vibration from windy elements. As mentioned earlier, drills, road traffic and pumps can also contribute to vibration for LED lights. Over time, the sources of vibration may result in minor cracks. The presence of extreme heat is known to streamline vibration-related damage.

Preventing Vibration in Light Poles

LEDs, due to their solid state design, are capable of withstanding vibration better than traditional light sources with loose filaments. Because of this, upgrading to industrial LED lights is one of the most effective ways to address vibration. Additionally, LEDs come with longer lifespans and superior illuminative properties.

Other solutions for reducing vibration for light poles and industrial LED lights include the installation of vibration dampeners. The components are designed to absorb shaky elements, so that it can be moved away from sensitive parts of the pole.

Operators may also choose to setup internal chains from the top of the pole, which serves as an absorber. This option is effective for lightweight systems, ensuring the added weight from the chains will anchor the pole securely on the ground.

In order to properly address vibration, one must first know the type of vibration at the work site. Such types include: first mode and second mode vibration.

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