NSF Zones and Classifications for Food Processing Lights May 4, 2018 May 4, 2018 Harsh Conditions
Food Processing Lights

The National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) governs and certifies equipment in the food service and manufacturing sector. Through various regulations and standards, the non-profit organization actively promotes food safety. For safe illumination in food processing sites, the NSF certifies lighting systems to ensure proper performance in such environments. Fixtures in industrial food manufacturing facilities must be capable of withstanding water jets from frequent wash-down sessions, as well as extreme temperatures found in sterilization tanks and freezers. Read below to learn more about food processing lights.

Non-food Zones

According to the NSF, a non-food zone is a location that doesn’t come in direct contact with food, food products and materials. Furthermore, a lighting system in this section of the food processing facility is expected to be exposed to cleaning agents and solutions used during wash-down sessions.

Based on these characteristics, a work light in a non-food zone should be waterproof, with an IP rating of IP65 or higher. Additionally, the units should be protected with shatterproof lens in order to reduce the risk of breakage, when exposed to water jets or during maintenance. For the light’s housing, materials capable of resisting corrosion are preferred. This can increase the lifespan of the units and decrease warping.

Splash and Food Zones

Like non-food zones, splash zones in food processing plants does not come in direct contact with food, food products and edible ingredients. Lights installed in such parts of the building must be able to withstand high-pressure, water jets from wash-down sessions.

Examples of splash zones include wet food processing locations and sections of the facility that experiences constant wash-down. By comparison, examples of non-food zones include dry food processing locations, industrial kitchens and large-scale food storage rooms.

Lastly, it is important to highlight that the NSF does not provide guidelines for lights in food zones. This is because the organization does not expect lights to come in direct contact with food products.

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